During this difficult time, you have our deepest sympathies.

How do I do this?

There’s no right or wrong way to grieve. According to Swiss psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’s 1969 book, On Death and Dying, it’s very common to experience grief in these five distinct ways:

  • Denial. This can’t be happening to me.
  • Anger. How can this be happening to me?
  • Bargaining. I will do anything to have my loved one back.
  • Depression. I’m just so sad. What’s the point?
  • Acceptance. I’m going to be OK.

The grieving process isn’t linear, and feelings may happen all at once, or not at all. Grieving takes time, and resources are available to help.

How can I get help?

Throughout the grief process, there may be times you feel like burdens are too heavy. Trained professionals may be able to help you through this difficult time. Here are some helpful resources to consider:

  • To locate a counselor, type “grief counseling in [your city]” into your preferred search engine, such as Google.com, to find one near you. You can also log into your health insurance provider’s website, where you may find a list of counselors where your insurance is accepted.
  • To find a grief support group near you, type “grief support groups in [your city]” into your preferred search engine. Your local hospice office may also have a list of resources and recommendations.
  • There are many books and publications that may help you as well. Browse your local library or search an online book vendor, such as Amazon.com, for grief support resources.